Cardiomyopathy

Disease of the heart muscle

Feline cardiomyopathy, particularly Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM), is a condition affecting the heart muscle. While cats may not always exhibit obvious symptoms, signs may include:

  • Difficulty breathing, including rapid or labored breathing
  • Coughing, especially a persistent cough
  • Open-Mouth Breathing: Cats may breathe with their mouths open or with significant movement of their abdomen, signs of severe respiratory distress.
  • Tires easily during physical activity or seems lethargic
  • Weakness, collapse, or fainting
  • Loss of appetite or decreased food intake
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Sudden hind limb pain or weakness (an indication of blood clots)
  • Cats often display more subtle signs of distress, such as hiding, reduced grooming, changes in vocalization, or altered litter box habits, including difficulty using the litter box or urinating outside the box.

Other health conditions may share similar symptoms with cardiomyopathy, including Hyperthyroidism, Feline Respiratory Infections, or other forms of heart disease.

If you notice any of these signs or if you have concerns about your pet's health, consult with your veterinarian. Seek immediate veterinary attention if you suspect your pet is having trouble breathing, has blue gums/tongue, or collapses. Early detection and intervention can improve the chances of successful management and prevent complications.

When you visit your veterinarian for concerns related to feline cardiomyopathy, the following may occur:

  • Medical history: They will review your pet's medical history and discuss details about your pet's symptoms, duration and any noticeable changes in behavior or appetite.
  • Physical examination: The veterinarian will perform a thorough physical examination of your pet, checking for any abnormalities, particularly related to the heart and lungs. Some cats with cardiomyopathy have abnormal heart rhythms or heart sounds (murmurs).
  • Diagnostic testing: Diagnostic testing such as blood tests, x-rays, electrocardiogram (ECG) and echocardiogram (ultrasound of the heart) may be recommended to evaluate for presence and severity of cardiomyopathy.
  • Testing for concurrent health issues: Hypertension (high blood pressure) and hyperthyroid disease are often diagnosed in cats with cardiomyopathy, so blood pressure measurement and thyroid blood testing may be included in the diagnostic process.
  • Treatment options: Treatment options for feline cardiomyopathy can vary depending on the type and severity of the disease. It may involve medication to manage symptoms, improve heart function, and prevent clot formation. In severe cases, hospitalization and oxygen therapy may be necessary.
  • Advanced diagnostic or treatment options: In some cases, referral to a veterinary cardiologist or internist may be advised for more advanced diagnostics and treatment.
  • Palliative care: In severe or chronic cases, palliative care focuses on improving your pet's quality of life, managing symptoms, and providing comfort.
  • Follow-up care: Your veterinarian will discuss a follow-up plan, which may involve regular monitoring of your pet's condition, additional tests, or adjustments to the treatment regimen.

Your veterinary healthcare team will partner with you to decide which treatment option is best for your cat's and your family’s specific goals and situation.

While it’s not possible to prevent most cases of cardiomyopathy, here are some things you can do at home to manage and prevent complications from cardiomyopathy:

  • Schedule regular veterinary check-ups: Routine examinations and screenings can help detect early signs of cardiomyopathy.
  • Maintain a balanced diet: Certain nutrients, such a taurine, are essential or feline cardiac health, and specific diets may be recommended to help manage heart health risks. Talk to your vet about your pet's particular health needs to ensure they are getting well-balanced nutrition.
  • Be vigilant in early detection and intervention: Watch for any changes in your pet's breathing, behavior, appetite, or activity level. Seek veterinary attention promptly for evaluation and potential early intervention if you notice any concerning signs or symptoms.
  • Reduce stress: Minimize stress in your cat's environment by keeping schedules consistent, offering safe hiding spaces, and providing stimulation with toys or play.
  • Maintain a healthy weight: Obesity has been linked to an increased risk of cardiac diseases in pets, so maintaining a healthy weight is important. Encourage regular, moderate exercise, but be mindful of your cat’s age and health status when determining the type and intensity of exercise.

Consult with your veterinarian for personalized advice and guidance on managing and preventing complications from cardiomyopathy in your pet. They can provide tailored recommendations based on your pet's specific needs and medical history.

Please note that the information provided here is not a substitute for professional veterinary advice. If you suspect your cat has feline cardiomyopathy or any other health concerns, consult your veterinarian for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Nationwide® pet insurance claim example

Veterinary bill

$768

You pay only

$77

Cardiomyopathy

You save

$692

Example reflects Accident & Illness plan with optional Congenital & Hereditary rider as well as the optional Cruciate rider added after the first year of coverage, with unlimited annual limit for each category with 90% reimbursement after the $250 annual deductible has been met. This plan may not be available in all areas. Pre-existing conditions are not covered. Veterinary bill amount is based on expenses incurred in the first 30 days after initial diagnosis.

Nationwide® pet insurance claim example

Veterinary bill

$768

You pay only

$77

Cardiomyopathy

You save

$692

Example reflects Accident & Illness plan with optional Congenital & Hereditary rider as well as the optional Cruciate rider added after the first year of coverage, with unlimited annual limit for each category with 90% reimbursement after the $250 annual deductible has been met. This plan may not be available in all areas. Pre-existing conditions are not covered. Veterinary bill amount is based on expenses incurred in the first 30 days after initial diagnosis.

Nationwide® pet insurance claim example

Veterinary bill

$768

You pay only

$77

Cardiomyopathy

You save

$692

Example reflects Accident & Illness plan with optional Congenital & Hereditary rider as well as the optional Cruciate rider added after the first year of coverage, with unlimited annual limit for each category with 90% reimbursement after the $250 annual deductible has been met. This plan may not be available in all areas. Pre-existing conditions are not covered. Veterinary bill amount is based on expenses incurred in the first 30 days after initial diagnosis.