Constipation

Difficulty in passing stools

Feline constipation, or difficulty in passing stools, can cause a variety of symptoms in pets. Signs may include:

  • Straining in the litter box or difficulty passing stools
  • Infrequent or absent bowel movements
  • Small, hard, or dry stools
  • Pain or discomfort while attempting to defecate, with vocalizations, restlessness, or signs of abdominal discomfort
  • Loss of appetite or decreased food intake
  • Vomiting: In some cases, constipated cats may vomit from straining
  • Lethargy or reduced activity levels
  • Cats often display more subtle signs of discomfort, such as hiding, reduced grooming, changes in vocalization, or altered litter box habits, including difficulty using the litter box or urinating/defecating outside the box.

Other health conditions may share similar symptoms with feline constipation, including Foreign Body Ingestion, gastrointestinal motility disorders, or Gastrointestinal cancer.

If you notice any of these signs or have concerns about your pet's health, consult with your veterinarian.

When you bring your cat to the veterinarian for concerns related to constipation, the following comprehensive approach may be taken:

  • Medical history: They will review your cat’s medical history and discuss details about your cat’s symptoms, duration and any noticeable changes in bowel habits, diet or lifestyle.
  • Physical examination: The veterinarian will perform a thorough exam of your pet, checking for any abnormalities in their abdomen and rectal area.
  • Diagnostic testing: Diagnostic procedures such as radiographs (X-rays) or blood tests may be recommended to evaluate the presence and severity of constipation. In some cases, additional tests such as ultrasound or fecal analysis may be necessary.
  • Treatment options: Treatment options for constipation can vary depending on the underlying cause and severity. They may involve dietary modifications, increased water intake, stool softeners, or medications to promote bowel movement. For more severe cases, manual removal of hardened stool under anesthesia or surgery may be necessary.
  • Follow-up care: Your veterinarian will discuss a follow-up plan, which may involve regular monitoring of your pet's condition, additional tests, or adjustments to the treatment regimen.

Your veterinary healthcare team will partner with you to decide which treatment option is best for your pet's and your family’s specific condition and situation.

While preventing feline constipation entirely may not be guaranteed, there are proactive measures you can take at home to reduce the risk and promote optimal gut health for your cat:

  • Encourage water intake: Ensure your cat always has access to fresh and clean water. Consider using a pet fountain or adding water to their food to encourage hydration. Wet cat food, which has higher moisture content, can be beneficial in supporting hydration.
  • Provide a balanced diet: Feed your pet a well-balanced diet that includes an appropriate amount of fiber to support healthy digestion.
  • Promote regular exercise: Engage your pet in regular exercise to promote proper bowel movement and overall gastrointestinal health. Playtime, interactive toys, and climbing structures can contribute to keeping your cat active.
  • Keep litter boxes accessible: Ensure that the litter box is easily accessible and appealing to your cat. Some cats may have preferences for certain types of litter or the location of the litter box.
  • Maintain healthy weight: Maintain a healthy weight for your cat through a well-balanced diet and portion control. Obesity can contribute to various health issues, including constipation.

Consult with your veterinarian for personalized advice and guidance on preventing or managing constipation in your cat. They can provide tailored recommendations based on your pet's specific needs and medical history.

Please note that the information provided here is not a substitute for professional veterinary advice. If you suspect your pet has constipation or any other health concerns, consult your veterinarian for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Nationwide® pet insurance claim example

Veterinary bill

$720

You pay only

$72

Constipation

You save

$648

Example reflects Accident & Illness plan with optional Congenital & Hereditary rider as well as the optional Cruciate rider added after the first year of coverage, with unlimited annual limit for each category with 90% reimbursement after the $250 annual deductible has been met. This plan may not be available in all areas. Pre-existing conditions are not covered. Veterinary bill amount is based on expenses incurred in the first 30 days after initial diagnosis.

Nationwide® pet insurance claim example

Veterinary bill

$720

You pay only

$72

Constipation

You save

$648

Example reflects Accident & Illness plan with optional Congenital & Hereditary rider as well as the optional Cruciate rider added after the first year of coverage, with unlimited annual limit for each category with 90% reimbursement after the $250 annual deductible has been met. This plan may not be available in all areas. Pre-existing conditions are not covered. Veterinary bill amount is based on expenses incurred in the first 30 days after initial diagnosis.

Nationwide® pet insurance claim example

Veterinary bill

$720

You pay only

$72

Constipation

You save

$648

Example reflects Accident & Illness plan with optional Congenital & Hereditary rider as well as the optional Cruciate rider added after the first year of coverage, with unlimited annual limit for each category with 90% reimbursement after the $250 annual deductible has been met. This plan may not be available in all areas. Pre-existing conditions are not covered. Veterinary bill amount is based on expenses incurred in the first 30 days after initial diagnosis.