Neurologic cancer

Cancer of the brain, spinal cord, or nerve cells

Neurologic cancer can cause a variety of symptoms in pets. Common types of neurologic cancer include meningiomas and gliomas. Signs may include:

  • Seizures or convulsions: These may manifest as involuntary shaking, twitching, or loss of consciousness, often with urination or defecation.
  • Changes in coordination or balance, such as difficulty walking, stumbling, or unsteady movements
  • Weakness or paralysis in the limbs
  • Changes in behavior or personality, such as increased aggression, disorientation, or confusion
  • Loss of appetite or changes in eating habits
  • Head persistently tilted to the side or abnormal eye movements
  • Changes in vision or differences in the size of their pupils

Other health conditions may share similar symptoms with neurologic cancer, including Epilepsy, infections, injuries, or degenerative diseases of the nervous system.

If you notice any of these signs or if you have concerns about your pet's health, it's essential to consult with your veterinarian. Early detection and intervention can improve the chances of successful management and improve your pet's quality of life.

When you visit the veterinarian for concerns related to neurologic cancer, the following may occur:

  • Physical examination: The veterinarian will perform a thorough physical examination of your pet, paying close attention to their nervous system. They will check for any abnormalities, assess reflexes, and evaluate their coordination and balance.
  • Diagnostic testing: Blood tests, imaging (such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI), cerebrospinal fluid analysis, or biopsies may be recommended to evaluate the presence and extent of the cancer. These tests help identify the location and type of neurologic cancer.
  • Treatment options: Treatment for neurologic cancer can vary depending on the specific type, location, and stage of the cancer. More aggressive options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. Palliative care, focused on managing symptoms and improving quality of life, is also an important consideration for pets with cancer affecting the nervous system.
  • Advanced diagnostic or treatment options: Referral to a veterinary oncologist, veterinary neurologist, or veterinary surgeon may be advised for specialized diagnostic or treatment options, especially in complex cases or for specific types of neurologic cancer.
  • Follow-up care: Based on your goals, you and your veterinarian will create a follow-up plan, which may involve regular monitoring, additional tests, or adjustments to the treatment plan. It’s crucial to maintain open communication with your veterinary care team throughout the process about how you and your pet are doing.

The decision regarding treatment options should be made in partnership with your veterinary care team, considering your pet's and family’s individual circumstances and well-being.

Unfortunately, there are no specific measures to prevent neurologic cancer in pets. However, there are steps you can take to promote overall health and potentially reduce the risk of certain cancers:

  • Maintain a balanced diet: Specific diets may be recommended to help manage health risks, so talk to your vet about your pet's particular health needs to ensure they are getting well-balanced nutrition.
  • Weight management: Obesity has been linked to an increased risk of cancer in pets, so maintaining a healthy weight is important. Provide regular exercise and appropriate environmental enrichment for mental stimulation to keep your pet physically active and mentally engaged.
  • Environmental safety: Minimize exposure to environmental toxins and hazardous substances that may contribute to the development of cancer. Keep your pet away from cigarette smoke, chemical cleaners, pesticides, and other potentially harmful substances.
  • Cancer screening or genetic testing: For pets with a higher predisposition to specific types of cancer, cancer screening or genetic testing may be available. Consult with your veterinarian to determine if testing is appropriate for your pet.
  • Early detection and intervention: Be vigilant in observing any changes in your pet's behavior, appetite, or overall health. In addition to routine veterinary checkups, seek veterinary attention promptly for evaluation and potential early intervention if you notice any concerning signs or symptoms.

Please note that the information provided here is not a substitute for professional veterinary advice. If you suspect your pet has neurologic cancer or any other health concerns, consult your veterinarian for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Nationwide® pet insurance claim example

Veterinary bill

$2,960

You pay only

$296

Neurologic cancer

You save

$2,664

Example reflects Accident & Illness plan with optional Congenital & Hereditary rider as well as the optional Cruciate rider added after the first year of coverage, with unlimited annual limit for each category with 90% reimbursement after the $250 annual deductible has been met. This plan may not be available in all areas. Pre-existing conditions are not covered. Veterinary bill amount is based on expenses incurred in the first 30 days after initial diagnosis.

Nationwide® pet insurance claim example

Veterinary bill

$2,960

You pay only

$296

Neurologic cancer

You save

$2,664

Example reflects Accident & Illness plan with optional Congenital & Hereditary rider as well as the optional Cruciate rider added after the first year of coverage, with unlimited annual limit for each category with 90% reimbursement after the $250 annual deductible has been met. This plan may not be available in all areas. Pre-existing conditions are not covered. Veterinary bill amount is based on expenses incurred in the first 30 days after initial diagnosis.

Nationwide® pet insurance claim example

Veterinary bill

$2,960

You pay only

$296

Neurologic cancer

You save

$2,664

Example reflects Accident & Illness plan with optional Congenital & Hereditary rider as well as the optional Cruciate rider added after the first year of coverage, with unlimited annual limit for each category with 90% reimbursement after the $250 annual deductible has been met. This plan may not be available in all areas. Pre-existing conditions are not covered. Veterinary bill amount is based on expenses incurred in the first 30 days after initial diagnosis.